Has opposition to ISO 29119 really died down?

One of my concerns about the Stop 29119 campaign, ever since it was launched four years ago, was that ISO would try to win the debate by default, by ignoring the opposition. In my CAST 2014 talk, which kicked off the campaign, I talked about ISO’s attempt to define its opponents as being irrelevant. ISO breached its own rules requiring consensus from the profession, and in order to justify doing so they had to maintain a pretence that testers who opposed their efforts were a troublesome, old-fashioned faction that should be ignored.

That’s exactly what has happened. ISO have kept their collective heads down, tried to ride out the storm and emerged to claim that it was all a lot of fuss about nothing; the few malcontents have given up and gone away.

I have just come across a comment in the “talk” section of the Wikipedia article on ISO 29119, arguing for some warning flags on the article to be removed.

“…finally, the objection to this standard was (a) from a small but vocal group and (b) died down – the ballots of member National Bodies were unanimous in favour of publication. Furthermore, the same group objected to IEEE 829 as well.”

The opposition is significantly more than “a small but vocal group”, but I won’t dwell on that point. My concern here is point b. Have the objections died down? Yes, they have in the sense that the opponents of ISO 29119 have been less vocal. There have been fewer talks and articles pointing out the flaws in the principle and the detail of the standard.

However, there has been no change in the beliefs of the opposition. There comes a point when it feels unnecessary, even pointless, to keep repeating the same arguments without the other side engaging. You can’t have a one-sided debate. The Stop 29119 campaigners have other things to do. Frankly, attacking ISO 29119 is a dreary activity compared with most of the alternatives. I would prefer to do something interesting and positive rather than launching another negative attack on a flawed standard. However, needs must.

The argument that “ballots of member National Bodies were unanimous in favour of publication” may be true, but it is a circular point. The opponents of ISO 29119 argued convincingly that software testing is not an activity that lends itself to ISO style standardisation and that ISO failed to gain any consensus outside its own ranks. The fact that ISO are quite happy with that arrangement is hardly a convincing refutation of our argument.

The point about our opposition to the IEEE 829 standard is also true, but it’s irrelevant. Even ISO thought that standard was dated and inadequate for modern purposes. It decided to replace it rather than try to keep updating it. Unfortunately the creators of ISO 29119 repeated the fundamental mistakes that rendered IEEE 829 flawed and unsuitable for good testing.

I was pleased to discover that the author of the Wikipedia comment was on the ISO working group that developed ISO 29119 and wrote a blog defending the standard, or rather dismissing the opposition. It was written four years ago in the immediate aftermath of the launch of Stop 29119. It’s a pity it didn’t receive more attention at the time. The debate was far too one sided and we badly needed contributions from ISO 29119’s supporters. So, in order to provide a small demonstration that opposition to the standard is continuing I shall offer a belated response. I’ll quote Andrew’s arguments, section by section, in dark blue and then respond.

“As a member of the UK Mirror Panel to WG26, which is responsible for the ISO 29119 standard, I am disappointed to read of the objection to the standard led by the International Society for Software Testing, which has resulted in a formal petition to ISO.

I respectfully suggest that their objections would be more effective if they engaged with their respective national bodies, and sought to overcome their objections, constructively.

People who are opposing ISO 29119 claim:

  1. It is costly.
  2. It will be seen as mandatory skill for testers (which may harm individuality and freedom).
  3. It may reduce the ability to experiment and try non-conventional ways.
  4. Once the standard is accepted, testers can be held responsible for project failures (or non-compliance).
  5. Effort will be more on documentation and process rather than testing.
    Let us consider each of these in turn.”

The International Society for Software Testing (ISST) launched the petition against ISO 29119, but this was merely one aspect of the campaign against the standard. Opposition was certainly not confined to ISST. The situation is somewhat confused by the fact that ISST disbanded in 2017. One of the prime reasons was that the “objectives set out by the founders have been met, or are in the capable hands of organisations that we support”. The main organisation referred to here is the larger and more established Association for Software Testing (AST), which can put more resources into the fight. I always felt the main differences between ISST and AST were in style and approach rather than principles and objectives.

The suggestion that the opponents of ISO 29119 should have worked through national ISO bodies is completely unrealistic. ISO’s approach is fundamentally wrong and opponents would have been seen as a wrecking crew preventing any progress. I know of a couple of people who did try and involve themselves in ISO groups and gave up in frustration. The debate within ISO about a standard like 29119 concerns the detail, not the underlying approach. In any case the committment required to join an ISO working group is massive. Meetings are held all over the world. They take up a lot of time and require huge expenses for travel and accommodation. That completely excludes independent consultants like myself.

“Costly

Opponents object to this standard because it is not freely available.

While this is a fair point, it is no different from every other standard that is in place – and which companies follow, often because it gives them a competitive advantage.

Personally, I would like to see more standards placed freely in the public domain, but I am not in a position to do it!”

The cost of the standard is a minor criticism. As a member of the AST’s Committee on Standards and Professional Practice I am fortunate to have access to the documents comprising the standard. These cost hundreds of dollars and I would baulk at buying them for myself. The full set would cost as much as a family holiday. I know which would be more important!

However, the cost does hamper informed debate about the content, and that was the true concern. The real damage of a poorly conceived standard will be poorer quality testing and that will be far more costly than the initial cost of the documents.

“Mandatory

Opponents claim this standard will be seen as a mandatory skill for testers (which may harm individuality and freedom).

ISO 29119 replaces a number of IEEE and British standards that have been in place for many years. And while those standards are seen to represent best practice, they have not been mandatory.”

I have two big issues with this counter argument. Firstly, the standards that ISO 29119 replaced were emphatically not “seen to represent best practice”. If they were best practice there would have been no need to replace them. They were hopelessly out of date but IEEE 829 was unhelpful, even damaging, when it was new.

My second concern is about the way that people respond to a standard. Back in 2009 I wrote this article “Do standards keep testers in the kindergarten?” in Testing Experience magazine arguing against the principle of testing standards, the idea of best practice and the inevitable danger of an unhelpful and dated standard like IEEE 829 being imposed on unwilling testers.

Once you’ve called a set of procedures a standard the argument is over in many organisations; testers are required to use them. It is disingenuous to say that standards are not mandatory. They are sold on the basis that they offer reassurance and that the wise, safe option is to make them compulsory.

I made this argument nine years ago thinking the case against standards had been won. I was dismayed to discover subsequently that ISO was trying to take us back several decades with ISO 29119.

“Experimentation

A formal testing environment should be a place where processes and procedures are in place, and is not one where ‘experiment and non-conventional’ methods are put in place. But having said that, there is nothing within ISO 29199 that prevents other methods being used.”

There may be a problem over the word “experiment” here. Andrew seems to think that testers who talk of experimentation are admitting they don’t know what they’re doing and are making it up as they go along. That would be an unfortunate interpretation. When testers from the Context Driven School refer to experimentation they mean the act of testing itself.

Good testing is a form of exploration and experimentation to find out how the product behaves. Michael Bolton describes that well here. A prescriptive standard that focuses on documentation distracts from, and effectively discourages, such exploring and experimentation. We have argued that at length and convincingly. It would be easier to analyse Andrew’s case if he had provided links to arguments from opponents who had advocated a form of experimentation he disapproves of.

“Accountability

Opponents claim that, once the standard is accepted, testers can be held responsible for project failures (or non-compliance).

As with any process or procedure, all staff are required to ensure compliance with the company manual – and project managers should be managing their projects to ensure that all staff are doing so.

Whether complying with ISO 29119 or any other standard or process, completion of testing and signing off as ‘passed’ carries accountability. This standard does not change that.”

This is a distortion of the opponents’ case. We do believe in accountability, but that has to be meaningful. Accountability must be based on something to which we can reasonably sign up. We strongly oppose attempts to enforce accountability to an irrelevant, poorly conceived and damaging standard. Complying with such a standard is orthogonal to good testing; there is no correlation between the two activities.

At best ISO 29119 would be an irrelevance. In reality it is more likely to be a hugely damaging distraction. If a company imposes a standard that all testers should wear laboratory technicians’ white coats it might look impressively professional, but complying with the standard would tell us nothing about the quality of the testing.

As a former auditor I have strong, well informed, views about accountability. One of ISO 29119’s serious flaws is that it fails to explain why we test. We need such clarity before we can have any meaningful discussion about compliance. I discussed this here, in “Do we want to be ‘compliant’ or valuable?”

The standard defines in great detail the process and the documents for testing, but fails to clarify the purpose of testing, the outcomes that stakeholders expect. To put it bluntly, ISO 29119 is vague about the ends towards which we are working, but tries to be precise about the means of getting there. That is an absurd combination.

ISO 29119 tries to set out rules without principles. Understanding the distinction between rules and principles is fundamental to the process of crafting professional standards that can hold practitioners meaningfully to account. I made this argument in the Fall 2015 edition of Better Software magazine. The article is also available on my blog, “Why ISO 29119 is a flawed quality standard”.

This confusion of rules and principles, means and ends, has led to an obsessive focus on delivering documentation rather than valuable information to stakeholders. That takes us on to Andrew’s next argument.

“Documentation

Opponents claim that effort will be more on documentation and process rather than testing.

I fail to understand this line of reasoning – any formal test regime requires a test specification, test cases and recorded test results. And the evidence produced by those results need argument. None of this is possible without documentation.”

Opponents of ISO 29119 have argued repeatedly and convincingly that a prescriptive standard which concentrates on documentation will inevitably lead to goal displacement; testers will concentrate on the documentation mandated by the standard and lose sight of why they are testing. That was our experience with IEEE 829. ISO 29119 repeats the same mistake.

Andrew’s second paragraph offers no refutation of the opponents’ argument. He apparently believes that we are opposed to documentation per se. That’s a straw man. Andrew justifies ISO 29119’s demand for documentation, which I believe is onerous and inappropriate, by asserting that it serves as evidence. Opponents argue that the standard places far too much emphasis on advance documentation and neglects evidence of what was discovered by the testing.

The statement that any formal test regime requires a test specification and test cases is highly contentious. Auditors would expect to see evidence of planning, but test specifications and test cases are just one way of doing it, the way that ISO 29119 advocates. In any case, advance planning is not evidence that good testing was performed any more than a neat project plan provides evidence that the project ran to time.

As for the results, the section of ISO 29119 covering test completion reports is woefully inadequate. It would be possible to produce a report that complied fully with the standard and offered nothing of value. That sums up the problems with ISO 29119. Testers can comply while doing bad testing. That is in stark contrast to the standards governing more established professions, such as accountants and auditors.

“Conclusion

Someone wise once said:

  1. Argument without Evidence is unfounded.
  2. Evidence without Argument is unexplained.

Having considered the argument put forward, and the evidence to support the case:

  • The evidence is circumstantial with no coherence.
  • The argument is weak, and seems only to support their vested interests.

For a body that represents test engineers, I would have expected better.”

The quote that Andrew uses from “someone wise” actually comes from the field of safety critical systems. There is much that we in conventional software testing can learn from that field. Perhaps the most important lessons are about realism and humility. We must deal with the world as it is, not as we would like it to be. We must accept the limitations of our knowledge and what we can realistically know.

The proponents of ISO 29119 are too confident in their ability to manage in a complex, evolving field using techniques rooted in the 1970s. Their whole approach tempts testers to look for confirmation of what they think they know already, rather than explore the unknown and explain what they cannot know.

Andrew’s verdict on the opposition to ISO 29119 should be turned around and directed at ISO and the standard itself. It was developed and launched in the absence of evidence that it would help testers to do a better job. The standard may have internal consistency, but it is incoherent when confronted with the complexities of the real world.

Testers who are forced to use it have to contort their testing to fit the process. Any good work they do is in spite of the standard and not because of it. It might provide a welcome route map to novice testers, but it offers a dangerous illusion. The standard tells them how to package their work so it appears plausible to those who don’t know any better. It defines testing in a way that makes it appear easier than it really is. But testing is not meant to be easy. It must be valuable. If you want to learn how to provide value to those who pay you then you need to look elsewhere.

Finally, I should acknowledge that some of the work I have cited was not available to Andrew when he wrote his blog in 2014. However, all of the underlying arguments and research that opponents of 29119 have drawn on were available long before then. ISO simply did not want to go looking for them. Our arguments about ISO 29119 being anti-competitive were at the heart of the Stop 29119 campaign. Andrew has not addressed those arguments.

If ISO wants to be taken seriously it must justify ISO 29119’s status as a standard. Principled, evidenced and coherent objections deserve a response. In a debate all sides have a duty to respond to their opponents’ strongest case, rather than evading difficult objections, setting up straw men and selectively choosing the arguments that are easiest to deal with.

ISO must provide evidence and coherent evidence that 29119 is effective. Simply labelling a set of prescriptive processes as a standard and expecting the industry to respect it for that reason will not do. That is the sign of a vested interest seeking to impose itself on a whole profession. No, the opposition has not died down; it has not had anything credible to oppose.

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